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RFC Number : 869

Title : Host Monitoring Protocol.




RFC - 869






A Host Monitoring Protocol















Robert M. Hinden





BBN Communications Corporation





December 1983














RFC-869 December 1983



Table of Contents





1 Introduction.......................................... 1

2 General Description................................... 3

3 Relationship to Other Protocols....................... 6

4 Protocol Operation.................................... 7

5 Header Formats....................................... 12
5.1 IP Headers......................................... 12
5.2 HMP Header......................................... 13

6 HMP Monitoring Center Message Formats................ 16
6.1 Message Type 100: Polling Message.................. 16
6.2 Message Type 101: Error in Poll.................... 18
6.3 Message Type 102: Control acknowledgment........... 20

A Appendix A - IMP Monitoring.......................... 21
A.1 Message Type 1: IMP Trap........................... 21
A.2 Message Type 2: IMP status......................... 24
A.3 Message Type 3: IMP Modem Throughput............... 29
A.4 Message Type 4: IMP Host Throughput................ 32

B Appendix B - TAC Monitoring.......................... 35
B.1 Message Type 1: TAC Trap Message................... 35
B.2 Message Type 2: TAC Status......................... 38
B.3 Message Type 3: TAC Throughput..................... 42

C Appendix C - Gateway Monitoring...................... 47
C.1 Gateway Parameters................................. 47
C.2 Message Type 1: Gateway Trap....................... 48
C.3 Message Type 2: Gateway Status..................... 51
C.4 Message Type 3: Gateway Throughput................. 58
C.5 Message Type 4: Gateway Host Traffic Matrix........ 64
C.6 Message Type 6: Gateway Routing.................... 67










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RFC-869 December 1983
Replaces IEN-197


A Host Monitoring Protocol





1 Introduction


The Host Monitoring Protocol (HMP) is used to collect

information from hosts in various networks. A host is

defined as an addressable Internet entity that can send and

receive messages; this includes hosts such as server hosts,

personal work stations, terminal concentrators, packet switches,

and gateways. At present the Host Monitoring Protocol is being

used to collect information from Internet Gateways and TACs, and

implementations are being designed for other hosts. It is

designed to monitor hosts spread over the internet as well as

hosts in a single network.


This document is organized into three parts. Section 2 and

3 contains a general description of the Host Monitoring protocol

and its relationship to other protocols. Section 4 describes

how it operates. Section 5 and 6 contain the descriptions and

formats of the HMP messages. These are followed by appendices

containing the formats of messages sent by some of the hosts that

use the HMP to collect their monitoring information. These

appendicies included as examples only and are not part of the HMP

protocol.




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RFC-869 December 1983



This document replaces the previous HMP document 'IEN-197, A

Host Monitoring Protocol.'
















































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RFC-869 December 1983



2 General Description


The Host Monitoring Protocol is a transaction-oriented

(i.e., connection-less) transport protocol. It was designed to

facilitate certain simple interactions between two internet

entities, one of which may be considered to be 'monitoring' the

other. (In discussing the protocol we will sometimes speak of a

'monitoring host' and a 'monitored entity'.) HMP was intended to

be a useful transport protocol for applications that involve any

or all of the following three different kinds of interactions:


- The monitored entity sometimes needs to send unsolicited
datagrams to the monitoring host. The monitoring host
should be able to tell when messages from the monitored
entity have been lost in transit, and it should be able to
determine the order in which the messages were sent, but the
application does not require that all messages be received
or that they be received strictly in the same sequence in
which they were sent.

- The monitoring host needs to gather data from the monitored
entity by using a query-response protocol at the application
level. It is important to be able to determine which query
is being answered by a particular response, and to determine
whether successive responses are duplicates of previous
ones.

- The monitoring host must be able to initiate certain control
functions in the monitored entity, possibly including the
setting of parameters in the monitored entity. The
monitoring host needs to know if the control function has
been carried out.


In addition, we assume that a given monitoring host may be

monitoring several different types of entities simultaneously,

and may be gathering several different types of data from a given



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RFC-869 December 1983



type of monitored entity. Several different monitoring hosts may

be monitoring a given entity, and several processes on the same

host may even be monitoring the same entity.


Messages from the monitoring host to the monitored entity

are called 'polls'. They need to contain enough information to

allow the monitored entity to make the following determinations:


- The monitored entity must be able to determine that this
message is in fact a poll from a monitoring host. The
'system type,' 'message type,' and 'password' fields in the
HMP header have been defined to meet this need.

- The monitored entity may need to be able to identify the
particular process on the monitoring host that sent this
poll, so it can send its response back to the right process.
The 'port number' field in the HMP header has been defined
to meet this need.

- The monitored entity must be able to indicate to the
monitoring host, in its response, precisely which query is
being answered by a particular response. The 'sequence
number field' has been defined to meet this need.

- The monitored entity must be able to determine just what
kind of action the monitoring host is requesting. That is,
the HMP transport protocol must provide some way of
multiplexing and demultiplexing the various higher-level
applications which use it. The 'R-message type' and 'R-
subtype' fields of the polling message have been defined to
meet this need.


Messages from the monitored entity to the monitoring host

need to contain enough information to enable the monitoring host

to make the following determination:


- The monitoring host must be able to route this message to
the correct process. The 'port number' field meets this
need.


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RFC-869 December 1983



- The monitoring host must be able to match up received
messages with the polls, if any, that elicited them. The
'returned sequence number' field in the HMP header has been
defined to meet this need.

- The monitoring host must be able to determine which higher
level application should receive a particular message. The
'system type' and 'message type' fields are used for this
purpose.

- The monitoring host must be able to determine whether some
messages of a given type were lost in transit, and whether
messages have arrived out of sequence. Although this
function, strictly speaking, belongs to the application and
not to the transport layer, the HMP header contains a
'sequence number' for this purpose.


In addition, a simple one's complement checksum is provided

in the HMP header to detect data corruption during transmission.






























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RFC-869 December 1983



3 Relationship to Other Protocols


The Host Monitoring Protocol is a transport protocol

designed to fit into the layered internet protocol environment.

It operates on top of the Internet/ICMP protocol and under

applications that require its services. This relationship is

illustrated in the following diagram:


+------+ +------+ +-------+ +------+
|TELNET| ...| FTP | |GATEWAY| ... | TAC | Application Layer
+------+ +------+ +-------+ +------+
| | | |
| | | |
|__________| |_____________|
| |
+------+ +-------+
| TCP | | HMP | Transport Layer
+------+ +-------+
| |
| |
+-------------------------------------+
| Internet Protocol & ICMP | Internetwork Layer
+-------------------------------------+
|
+------------------------+
| Local Network Protocol | Network Layer
+------------------------+


If internetwork services are not required it should be possible

to run the HMP without an Internetwork layer. As long as HMPs'

service requirnments (addressing, protocol demultiplexing, and

occasional delivery) are met it should run over a variety of

protocols.







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RFC-869 December 1983



4 Protocol Operation


The HMP is built around the idea that most of the

intelligence needed to monitor a host should reside in a

monitoring center, not in the host. The host should be required

only to collect data and send it to the monitoring center, either

spontaneously or on request from the monitoring center. The host

is not responsible for insuring that the data arrives reliably

(except that it checksums the data); instead, the monitoring

center is responsible for ensuring that the data it requests is

received correctly.


Consequently, the HMP is based on polling hosts for

messages. When the monitoring center requires a particular type

of data (e.g., throughput data), it sends a poll to the host

requesting that type of report. The host, upon receiving the

poll, responds with its latest set of collected data. If the

host finds that the poll is incorrect (e.g., if the poll was for

throughput data and the host is not collecting throughput data),

it responds with an error message. The monitoring center waits a

reasonable length of time for the host to answer its poll. If no

response is received, it sends another poll for the same data.

In this way, if either a poll or the response is lost, the

correct data is still collected.






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RFC-869 December 1983



The HMP is used to collect three different classes of data:


o Spontaneous Events (or Traps)

o Current status

o Statistical data collected over time


These classes of data allow a host to send data in a manner best

suited to the data. For instance, the host may quickly inform

the monitoring center that a particular event has happened by

sending a trap message, while the monitoring center is reliably

collecting the host's throughput and accounting data.


Traps report spontaneous events, as they occur, to the

monitoring center. In order to insure their prompt delivery, the

traps are sent as datagrams with no reliability mechanisms

(except checksums) such as acknowledgments and retransmissions.

Trap messages usually contain an identifier to indicate which

event is being reported, the local time in the host that the

event occured, and data pertinent to the event. The data portion

is intended to be host and event specific.


Status information, the second type of data collected by the

Host Monitoring Protocol describes the current state of the host.

Status information is useful at one point, but it does not have

to be collected cumulatively over a certain period of time. Only

the latest status is of interest; old status provides no useful

information. The monitoring center collects status information


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RFC-869 December 1983



by sending a poll for status to a host. Upon receiving the poll,

the host responds with its latest status information, always

creating a new status message. If the monitoring center does not

receive a response to its poll, it sends another poll. The

monitoring center can decide if the host is up or down based on

whether the host responds to its polls.


The third type of data collected by the HMP is statistical

data. These are measurements taken over time, such as the number

of packets sent or received by a host and the count of packets

dropped for a particular reason. It is important that none of

this type of data be lost. Statistical data is collected in a

host over a time interval. When the collection time interval

expires, the current data is copied to another area, and the

counters are cleared. The copied data is sent to the monitoring

center when the host receives a poll requesting statistical

information. If another poll is received before the collection

time interval has expired, the data in the buffer is sent again.

The monitoring center can detect duplicate messages by using the

sequence number in the header of the message, since each type of

statistical data has its own sequence number counter.


The collection frequency for statistics messages from a

particular host must be relatively long compared to the average

round trip message time between the monitoring center and that

host inorder to allow the monitoring center to re-poll if it does


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RFC-869 December 1983



not receive an answer. With this restriction, it should be

possible to avoid missing any statistics messages. Each

statistics message contains a field giving the local time when

the data was collected and the time at which the message was

sent. This information allows the monitoring center to schedule

when it sends a poll so that the poll arrives near the beginning

of each collection period. This ensures that if a message is

lost, the monitoring center will have sufficient time to poll

again for the statistics message for that period.


The HMP also includes a provision to send data to and read

parameters in hosts. The data may be used to set switches or

interval timers used to control measurements in a host, or to

control the host itself (e.g. a restart switch). The format of

the data and parameters is host specific.


To send data to a host, the monitoring center sends the host

a poll for a control-acknowledgment message. This poll message

includes the type of the data and the data being sent. When the

host receives this poll, it processes the data and responds with

a control-acknowledgment message.


To read parameters in a host, the monitoring center will

send a poll for parameters to the host. This poll includes the

type of the parameters being read. When the host receives this

poll, it will send the parameters of the requested type to the



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RFC-869 December 1983



monitoring center in a parameters message.


















































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RFC-869 December 1983



5 Header Formats


Host Monitor Protocol messages have the following format:

+----------------+
| Local Network |
| Header(s) |
+----------------+
| IP header |
+----------------+
| HMP |
| Header |
| |
+----------------+
| D |
| A |
| T |
| A |
+----------------+
| Padding |
+----------------+





5.1 IP Headers

HMP messages are sent using the version 4 IP header as described
in RFC-791 'Internet Protocol.' The HMP protocol number is 20
(decimal). The time to live field should be set to a reasonable
value for the hosts being monitored.

All other fields should be set as specified in RFC-791.
















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RFC-869 December 1983



5.2 HMP Header

The HMP header format is:

0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+---------------+---------------+
0 | System Type | Message Type |
+---------------+---------------+
1 | Port Number | Control Flag |
+---------------+---------------+
2 | Sequence Number |
+---------------+---------------+
3 | Password or Returned Seq. # |
+---------------+---------------+
4 | One's Complement Checksum |
+---------------+---------------+

HMP FIELDS:

System Type
Message Type

The combination of system type and message type determines
the format of the data in the monitoring message.

The system types which have been defined are:


System Type | Meaning
----------------+-----------------
1 | Monitoring Host
2 | IMP
3 | TAC
4 | Gateway
5 | SIMP
6 | BBN VAX/C70 TCP
7 | PAD
8 | Reserved
9 | TIU
10 | FEP
11 | Cronus Host
12 | Cronus MCS








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RFC-869 December 1983



Message types are defined and used for each system type
according to the needs of that system. The message types
currently defined are:



Type | Description
----------+--------------------------
|
1 | Trap
2 | Status
3 | Thruput
4 | HTM - Host Traffic Matrix
5 | Parameters
6 | Routing
7 | Call Accounting
|
100 | Poll
101 | Error
102 | Control Acknowledgment




Port Number

This field can be used to multiplex similar messages to/from
different processes in one host. It is currently unused.

Control Flag

This field is used to pass control information. Currently
Bit 15 is defined as the 'More bit' which is used in a
message in responce to a poll to indicate that there is more
data to poll for.

Sequence Number

Every message contains a sequence number. The sequence
number is incremented when each new message of that type is
sent.

Password or Returned Sequence Number

The Password field of a polling message from an monitoring
center contains a password to verify that the monitoring
center is allowed to gather information. Responses to
polling messages copy the Sequence Number from the
polling message and return it in this field for


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RFC-869 December 1983



identification and round-trip time calculations.

Checksum

The Checksum field is the one's complement of the one's
complement sum of all the 16-bit words in the header and
data area.












































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RFC-869 December 1983



6 HMP Monitoring Center Message Formats

6.1 Message Type 100: Polling Message

Description

The monitoring center will send polls to the hosts it is
monitoring to collect their monitoring data. When the host
receives a poll it will return a message of the type
requested. It will only answer a poll with the correct
system type and password and will return an error message
(Message Type 101) if it receives a poll for the wrong
system type or an unsupported message type.

The Poll message includes a facility to send data to a
monitored host. The poll message to send data consists of a
poll for a Control Acknowledgment message (type 102)
followed by the data. The R-Subtype specifies the type of
the data that is being sent. When the monitored host
receives a Poll for a Control acknowledgment, it processes
the data, and then responds with an Control acknowledgment
message. If the monitored host can not process the data, it
should respond with an error message.

A poll to read parameters consists a poll for a Parameters
message. The R-Subtype specifies the type of parameters
being read. When the monitored host receives a poll for a
Parameters message, it responds with a Parameters message
containing the requested information.

A polling message has the following form:

0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+---------------+---------------+
0 | R-Message Type| R-Subtype |
+---------------+---------------+

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
1 | Data |
+ +
2 | |
+ +
. .
. .
n | |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+




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RFC-869 December 1983



HMP FIELDS

System Type

The type of machine being polled.

Message Type

Polling Message = 100

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Sequence Number

The sequence number identifies the polling request. The
Monitoring Center will maintain separate sequence numbers
for each host it monitors. This sequence number is returned
in the response to a poll and the monitoring center will use
this information to associate polls with their responses and
to determine round trip times.

Password

The monitoring password.

POLL FIELDS

R-Message Type

The message type requested.

R-Subtype

This field is used when sending data and reading parameters
and it specifies the type of the data being sent or
parameters being read.

Data

When the poll is requesting a Control Acknowledgment
message, data is included in the poll message. A poll for
any other type of message does not include any data . The
contents of the data is host specific.


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RFC-869 December 1983



6.2 Message Type 101: Error in Poll

Description

This message is sent in response to a faulty poll and
specifies the nature of the error.

An error message has the following form:

0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+---------------+---------------+
0 | Error Type |
+---------------+---------------+
1 | R-Message Type| R-Subtype |
+---------------+---------------+

HMP FIELDS

System Type

The type of machine sending message.

Message Type

Error Message = 101

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time an error message is
sent.

Returned Sequence Number

The Sequence Number of the polling message which caused the
error.







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RFC-869 December 1983



ERROR MESSAGE FIELDS

Error Type

This field specifies the nature of the error in the poll.
The following error types have been defined.


1 = Reason unspecified.
2 = Bad R-Message Type.
3 = Bad R-Subtype.
4 = Unknown parameter
5 = Invalid parameter value
6 = Invalid parameter/value format
7 = Machine in Loader

R-Message Type
R-Subtype

These fields identify the poll request in error.































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RFC-869 December 1983



6.3 Message Type 102: Control acknowledgment

Description

This message is sent in response to a poll for this type of
message. It is used to acknowledge poll messages that are
used to set parameters in the monitored host.

The Control acknowledgment has no fields other than the HMP
header.

HMP FIELDS

System Type

The type of the system sending the message.

Message Type

Control acknowledgment = 102

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time a Control
acknowledgment message is sent.

Returned Sequence Number

The Sequence Number of the polling message which requested
this message.













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RFC-869 December 1983



A Appendix A - IMP Monitoring

A.1 Message Type 1: IMP Trap

Description

When a trap occurs, it is buffered in the IMP and sent as
soon as possible. Trap messages are unsolicited. If traps
happen in close sequence, several traps may be sent in one
message.

Through the use of sequence numbers, it will be possible to
determine how many traps are being lost. If it is
discovered that many are lost, a polling scheme might be
implemented for traps.

A IMP trap message has the following form:

0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+---------------+---------------+
0 | # of traps lost |
+---------------+---------------+
1 : first :
. : trap :
. : data :
. +---------------+---------------+
. : additional :
. : trap :
. : data :
+---------------+---------------+


HMP Fields

System Type

IMP = 2

Message Type

IMP Trap Message = 1

Port Number

Unused





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RFC-869 December 1983



Control Flag

Unused

Password

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time a trap message is sent
so that the HM can order the received trap messages and
detect missed messages.

IMP TRAP FIELDS

# of traps lost

Under certain conditions, an IMP may overflow its internal
trap buffers and be unable to save traps to send. This
counter keeps track of such occurrences.

Trap Reports

There can be several blocks of trap data in each message.
The format for each such block is below.



+---------------+---------------+
| Size |
+---------------+---------------+
| Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Trap ID |
+---------------+---------------+
: Trap :
: Data :
+---------------+---------------+


Size

Size is the number of 16 bit words in the trap, not counting
the size field.

Time

The time (in 640 ms. units) at which the trap occurred.


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RFC-869 December 1983



This field is used to sequence the traps in a message and
associate groups of traps.

Trap ID

This is usually the program counter at the trap. The ID
identifies the trap, and does not have to be a program
counter, provided it uniquely identifies the trap.

Trap Data

The IMP returns data giving more information about the trap.
There are usually two entries: the values in the accumulator
and the index register at the occurrence of the trap.





































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RFC-869 December 1983



A.2 Message Type 2: IMP status

Description

The status message gives a quick summary of the state of the
IMP. Status of the most important features of the IMP are
reported as well as the current configuration of the
machine.

The format of the status message is as follows:

0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+---------------+---------------+
0 | Software Version Number |
+---------------+---------------+
| Last Trap Message |
+---------------+---------------+
| Max # Hosts | Max # Modems |
+---------------+---------------+
| Max # Channels| Max # IMPs |
+---------------+---------------+
| Package bits 0-15. |
+---------------+---------------+
5 | Package bits 16.-31. |
+---------------+---------------+
| |
+ Crash +
| |
+ Data +
| |
+---------------+---------------+
| Anomalies |
+---------------+---------------+
10 | Free Pool | S+F Pool |
+---------------+---------------+
|Reassembly Pool| Allocated Pool|
+---------------+---------------+
| HIHD0 | HIHD1 | HIHD2 | HIHD3 |
. +---------------+---------------+
. : HIHD4 | ............... :
. +---------------+---------------+
(cont.)








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Imp Status (cont.)

. +---------------+---------------+
. | Modem |
. + State +
. | Data |
. +---------------+---------------+
. : Modem State :
. : Data...... :
+---------------+---------------+



HMP FIELDS

System Type

IMP = 2

Message Type

IMP status message = 2

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time a status message is
sent.

Password

The password contains the sequence number of the polling
message to which this message responds.

IMP STATUS FIELDS

Software Version Number

The IMP version number.



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RFC-869 December 1983



Last Trap Message

Contains the sequence number of the last trap message sent
to the HM. This will allow the HM to detect how many trap
messages are being lost.

Hosts

The number of configured hosts in this system.

Modems

The number of configured modems in this system.

Channels

The maximum possible number of IMP-IMP channels in this
system.

IMPs

The maximum possible number of IMPs in this system.

Package Bits

This is a bit encoded word that reports the set of packages
currently loaded in the system. The table below defines the
bits.























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RFC-869 December 1983




Bit Package
(octal)
(1st Word)
1 VDH
2 Logical address tables
4 Mezmode
10 Cumulative Statistics
20 Trace
40 TTY
100 DDT
200 HDLC
400 HDH
1000 Cassette Writer
2000 Propagation Delay Measurement
4000 X25
10000 Profile Measurements
20000 Self Authenticating Password
40000 Host traffic Matrix
100000 Experimental/Special

(2nd Word)
1 End-to-end Statistics
2 Store and Forward statistics

Crash Data

Crash data reports the circumstances surrounding an
unexpected crash. The first word reports the location of
the crash and the following two are the contents of the
accumulator and index registers.

Anomalies

Anomalies is a collection of bit flags that indicate the
state of various switches or processes in the IMP. These
are very machine dependent and only a representative
sampling of bits is listed below.

Bit Meaning
(octal)
20 Override ON
200 Trace ON
1000 Statistics ON
2000 Message Generator ON
4000 Packet Trace ON
10000 Host Data Checksum is BAD
20000 Reload Location SET



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RFC-869 December 1983



Buffer Pool Counts

These are four bytes of counters indicating the current
usage of buffers in the IMP. The four counters are: free
buffers, store-and-forward buffers, reassembly buffers and
allocated buffers.

HIHD0 - HIHDn

Each four bit HIHD field gives the state of the
corresponding host.

Value Meaning
0 UP
1 ready line down
2 tardy
3 non-existent



Modem State Data

Modem state data contains six fields of data distributed
over four words. The first field (4 bits) indicates the
line speed; the second field (4 bits) is the number of the
modem that is used by the neighboring IMP on this line; the
third field (8 bits) is the number of line protocol ticks
covered by this report; the fourth (1 bit) indicates line
down(1) or up(0); the fifth (7 bits) is the IMP number of
neighbor IMP on the line; and the sixth (8 bits) is a count
of missed protocol packets over the interval specified in
the third field.



















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RFC-869 December 1983



A.3 Message Type 3: IMP Modem Throughput

Description

The modem throughput message reports traffic statistics for
each modem in the system. The IMP will collect these data at
regular intervals and save them awaiting a poll from the HM.
If a period is missed by the HM, the new results simply
overwrite the old. Two time stamps bracket the collection
interval (data-time and prev-time) and are an indicator of
missed reports. In addition, mess-time indicates the time
at which the message was sent.

The modem throughput message will accommodate up to fourteen
modems in one packet. A provision is made to split this
into multiple packets by including a modem number for the
first entry in the packet. This field is not immediately
useful, but if machine sizes grow beyond fourteen modems or
if modem statistics become more detailed and use more than
three words per modem, this can be used to keep the message
within a single ARPANET packet.

The format of the modem throughput message is as follows:

0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+---------------+---------------+
0 | Mess-Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Software Version Number |
+---------------+---------------+
| Data-Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Prev-Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Total Modems | This Modem |
+---------------+---------------+
5 | |
. + modem +
. | |
. + throughput +
. | |
. +---------------+---------------+
. : modem :
. : :
. : throughput :
+---------------+---------------+




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RFC-869 December 1983



HMP FIELDS


System Type

IMP = 2

Message Type

IMP Modem Throughput message = 3

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented at each collection interval
(i.e. when a new throughput message is assembled). The HM
will be able to detect lost or duplicate messages by
checking the sequence numbers.

Password

The password contains the sequence number of the polling
message to which this message responds.

IMP MODEM THROUGHPUT FIELDS

Mess-time

The time (in 640ms. units) at which the message was sent to
the HM.

Software Version Number

The IMP version number.

Data-Time

Data-time is the time (in 640ms. units) when this set of
data was collected. (See Description.)





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RFC-869 December 1983



Prev-Time

Prev-time is the time (in 640 ms. units) of the previous
collection of data (and therefore, is the time when the data
in this message began accumulating.)

Total Modems

This is the number of modems in the system.

This Modem

This Modem is the number of the first modem reported in this
message. Large systems that are unable to fit all their
modem reports into a single packet may use this field to
separate their message into smaller chunks to take advantage
of single packet message efficiencies.

Modem Throughput

Modem throughput consists of three words of data
reporting packets and words output on each modem. The
first word counts packets output and the following two
count word throughput. The double precision words are
arranged high order first. (Note also that messages from
Honeywell type machines (316s, 516s and C30s) use a fifteen
bit low order word.) The first block reports output on the
modem specified by 'This Modem'. The following blocks
report on consecutive modems.






















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RFC-869 December 1983



A.4 Message Type 4: IMP Host Throughput

Description

The host throughput message reports traffic statistics for
each host in the system. The IMP will collect these data at
regular intervals and save them awaiting a poll from the HM.
If a period is missed by the HM, the new results simply
overwrite the old. Two time stamps bracket the collection
interval (data-time and prev-time) and are an indicator of
missed reports. In addition, mess-time indicates the time
at which the message was sent.

The host throughput format will hold only three hosts if
packet boundaries are to be respected. A provision is made
to split this into multiple packets by including a host
number for the first entry in the packet.

The format of the host throughput message is as follows:

0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+---------------+---------------+
0 | Mess-Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Software Version Number |
+---------------+---------------+
| Data-Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Prev-Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Total Hosts | This Host |
+---------------+---------------+
5 : host :
. : throughput :
+---------------+---------------+

HMP FIELDS

System Type

IMP = 2

Message Type

IMP host Throughput message = 4





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RFC-869 December 1983



Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented at each collection interval
(i.e. when a new throughput message is assembled). The HM
will be able to detect lost or duplicate messages by
checking the sequence numbers.

Password

The password contains the sequence number of the polling
message to which this message responds.

IMP HOST THROUGHPUT FIELDS

Mess-time

The time (in 640ms. units) at which the message was sent to
the HM.

Software Version Number

The IMP version number.

Data-Time

Data-time is the time (in 640ms. units) when this set of
data was collected. (See Description.)

Prev-Time

Prev-time is the time (in 640 ms. units) of the previous
collection of data (and therefore, is the time when the data
in this message began accumulating.)

Total Hosts

The total number of hosts in this system.

This Host

This host is the number of the first host reported in this


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RFC-869 December 1983



message. Large systems that are unable to fit all their
host reports into a single packet may use this field to
separate their message into smaller chunks to take advantage
of single packet message efficiencies.

Host Throughput

Each host throughput block consists of eight words in the
following format:

+---------------+---------------+
| messages to network |
+---------------+---------------+
| messages from network |
+---------------+---------------+
| packets to net |
+---------------+---------------+
| packets from net |
+---------------+---------------+
| messages to local |
+---------------+---------------+
| messages from local |
+---------------+---------------+
| packets to local |
+---------------+---------------+
| packets from local |
+---------------+---------------+

Each host throughput message will contain several blocks of
data. The first block will contain data for the host
specified in First Host Number. Following blocks will
contain data for consecutive hosts. All counters are single
precision.


















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B Appendix B - TAC Monitoring

B.1 Message Type 1: TAC Trap Message

Description

When a trap occurs, it is buffered in the TAC and sent as
soon as possible. Trap messages are unsolicited. If traps
happen in close sequence, several traps may be sent in one
message.

Through the use of sequence numbers, it will be possible to
determine how many traps are being lost. If it is
discovered that many are lost, a polling scheme might be
implemented for traps.

A TAC trap message has the following form:

0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+---------------+---------------+
0 | Version # |
+---------------+---------------+
1 : first :
. : trap :
. : data :
. +---------------+---------------+
. : additional :
. : trap :
. : data :
+---------------+---------------+


HMP FIELDS

System Type

TAC = 3

Message Type

TAC Trap Message = 1

Port Number

Unused





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RFC-869 December 1983



Control Flag

Unused

Password or Returned Sequence Number

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time a trap message is sent
so that the HM can order the received trap messages and
detect missed messages.

TAC TRAP FIELDS

Version #

The version # of the TAC Software.

Trap Reports

There can be several blocks of trap data in each message.

The format of the trap data is as follows:


+---------------+---------------+
| Size |
+---------------+---------------+
| Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Trap ID |
+---------------+---------------+
: Trap :
: Data :
+---------------+---------------+
| Count |
+-------------------------------+

Size

Size is the number of 16 bit words in the trap, not counting
the size field.

Time

The time (in 640ms. units) at which the trap occurred. This
field is used to sequence the traps in a message and


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RFC-869 December 1983



associate groups of traps.

Trap ID

This is (usually) the program counter at the trap. The ID
identifies the trap, and does not have to be a program
counter, provided that it uniquely identifies the trap.

Trap Data

The TAC returns data giving more information about the trap.
There are usually two entries: the values in the accumulator
and the index register at the occurrence of the trap.

Count

The TAC Counts repetitions of the same trap ID and reports
this count here.

































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RFC-869 December 1983



B.2 Message Type 2: TAC Status

Description

The status message gives a quick summary of the state of the
TAC. Status of the most important features of the TAC are
reported as well as the current configuration of the
machine.


A TAC status message has the following form:


0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
---------------+---------------+
0 | Version Number |
+---------------+---------------+
| Last Trap Message |
+---------------+---------------+
| Bit Flags |
+---------------+---------------+
| Free PDB count |
+---------------+---------------+
| Free MBLK count |
+---------------+---------------+
5 | # of TCP connections |
+---------------+---------------+
| # of NCP connections |
+---------------+---------------+
| INA A Register |
+---------------+---------------+
| INA X Register |
+---------------+---------------+
| INA B Register |
+---------------+---------------+
l0 | restart/reload |
+---------------+---------------+
| |
+ Crash +
| |
+ Data +
13 | |
+---------------+---------------+







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RFC-869 December 1983



HMP FIELDS

System Type

TAC = 3

Message Type

TAC Status Message = 2

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time a status message is
sent.

Returned Sequence Number

Contains the sequence number from the polling message
requesting this report.

TAC STATUS FIELDS

Version Number

The TAC's software version number.

Last Trap Message

Contains the sequence number of the last trap message sent
to the HM. This will allow the HM to detect how many trap
messages are being lost.












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RFC-869 December 1983



Bit Flags

There are sixteen bit flags available for reporting the
state of various switches (hardware and software) in the
TAC. The bits are numbered as follows for purposes of the
discussion below.


0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

The bit flags report the status of the following:

Bit Meaning
15 0 => DDT override off; 1 => override on.
11-14 0 => Sense Switch n is off; 1 => SSn on.
10 0 => Traps to remote monitor;
1 => Traps to console.
9 1 => Message generator on.
0-8 unused

Free PDB count

The number of PDBs on the free queue.

Free MBLK count

The number of MBLKs on the free queue.

# of TCP connections
# of NCP connections

The number of open connections for each protocol.

INA Report

These three fields report the values retained by an INA 1011
instruction in a C/30. This instruction returns micro-
machine status and errors. In a #316, the fields are
meaningless.








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RFC-869 December 1983



Restart/Reload

This word reports a restart or reload of the TAC

Value Meaning
1 restarted
2 reloaded


Crash Data

Crash data reports the circumstances surrounding an
unexpected crash. The first word reports the location of
the crash and the following two are the contents of the
accumulator and index registers.




































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RFC-869 December 1983



B.3 Message Type 3: TAC Throughput

Description

The TAC throughput message reports statistics for the
various modules of the TAC. The TAC will collect these data
at regular intervals and save them awaiting a poll from the
HM. If a period is missed by the HM, the new results simply
overwrite the old. Two time stamps bracket the collection
interval (data-time and prev-time) and are an indicator of
missed reports. In addition, mess-time indicates the time
at which the message was sent.


A TAC throughput message has the following form:

0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+---------------+---------------+
0 | Mess-Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Data-Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Prev-Time |
+---------------+---------------+
| Version Number |
+---------------+---------------+
| Last Trap Message |
+---------------+---------------+
5 | Bit Flags |
+---------------+---------------+
| Free PDB count |
+---------------+---------------+
| Free MBLK count |
+---------------+---------------+
| # of TCP connections |
+---------------+---------------+
| # of NCP connections |
+---------------+---------------+ ----
10 | Host Input Throughput | ^
+---------------+---------------+ |
| Host Input Abort Count | |
+---------------+---------------+ |
| Host Input Garbled Count | |
+---------------+---------------+ |
| Host Output Throughput | 1822 info.
+---------------+---------------+ |
(continued)



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RFC-869 December 1983




TAC throughput (cont.)

+---------------+---------------+ |
| Host Output Abort Count | 1822 info.
+---------------+---------------+ |
15 | Host Down Count | v
+---------------+---------------+ ----
| # of datagrams sent | ^
+---------------+---------------+ |
| # of datagrams received | |
+---------------+---------------+ IP info.
| # of datagrams discarded | |
+---------------+---------------+ |
| # of fragments received | v
+---------------+---------------+ |
20 | # of fragments discarded | v
+---------------+---------------+ ----
| # of segments sent | ^
+---------------+---------------+ |
| # of segments received | |
+---------------+---------------+ |
| # of segments discarded | |
+---------------+---------------+ TCP info.
| # of octets sent | |
+---------------+---------------+ |
25 | # of octets received | |
+---------------+---------------+ |
| # of retransmissions | v
+---------------+---------------+ ----


HMP FIELDS

System Type

TAC = 3

Message Type

TAC Throughput Message = 3

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused


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RFC-869 December 1983



Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented at each collection interval
(i.e. when a new throughput message is assembled). The HM
will be able to detect lost or duplicate messages by
checking the sequence numbers.

Returned Sequence Number

Contains the sequence number from the polling message
requesting this report.

TAC THROUGHPUT FIELDS

Mess-time

The time (in 640ms. units) at which the message was sent to
the HM.

Data-Time

Data-time is the time (in 640ms. units) when this set of
data was collected. (See Description.)

Prev-Time

Prev-time is the time (in 640 ms. units) of the previous
collection of data (and therefore, is the time when the data
in this message began accumulating.)

Version Number

The TAC's software version number.

Last Trap Message

Contains the sequence number of the last trap message sent
to the HM. This will allow the HM to detect how many trap
messages are being lost.

Bit Flags

There are sixteen bit flags available for reporting the
state of various switches (hardware and software) in the
TAC. The bits are numbered as follows for purposes of the
discussion below.





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RFC-869 December 1983






0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+



The bit flags report the status of the following:

Bit Meaning
15 0 => DDT override off; 1 => override on.
11-14 0 => Sense Switch n is off; 1 => SSn on.
10 0 => Traps to remote monitor;
1 => Traps to console.
9 1 => Message generator on.
0-8 unused



Free PDB count

The number of PDBs on the free queue.

Free MBLK count

The number of MBLKs on the free queue.

# of TCP connections
# of NCP connections

The number of open connections for each protocol.

1822 info.

These six fields report statistics which concern the
operation of the 1822 protocol module, i.e. the interface
between the TAC and its IMP.

IP info.

These five fields report statistics which concern Internet
Protocol in the TAC.

TCP info.



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RFC-869 December 1983



These six fields report statistics which concern TCP
protocol in the TAC.

















































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RFC-869 December 1983



C Appendix C - Gateway Monitoring

C.1 Gateway Parameters

The gateway supports parameters to set Throughput and Host
traffic matrix measurements. The type of parameters and the
parameter and data pairs are as follows:

Throughput - Type = 3


Parm. Description Control Data Word
----- ----------- -----------------

1 Start/Stop 0=Stop,1=Start
2 Collection Interval Time in 1 minute
ticks


Host Traffic Matrix - Type = 4


Parm. Description Control Data Word
----- ----------- -----------------

1 Start/Stop 0=Stop,1=Start
2 Collection Interval Time in 1 minute
ticks
3 HTM Switch Control Include Control
Protocols





















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RFC-869 December 1983



C.2 Message Type 1: Gateway Trap

Description

When traps occur in the gateway they are buffered. At a
fixed time interval (currently 10 seconds) the gateway will
send any traps that are in the buffer to the monitoring
center. The traps are sent as unsolicited messages.

A Gateway trap message has the following format:

0 0 0 1
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Gateway Version # |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Size of Trap Entry | ;First Trap
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Time of Trap |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Trap ID |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Process ID |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| R0 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| R1 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| R2 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| R3 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
(continued)
















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RFC-869 December 1983



Gateway Trap Message (cont'd.)


+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| R4 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| R5 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| R6 |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of this Trap |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
.
.
.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| |
| Additional Trap reports |
| |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

HMP FIELDS

System Type

Gateway = 4

Message Type

Gateway Trap Message = 1

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Password or Returned Sequence Number

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time a trap message is sent
so that the monitoring center can order the received trap
messages and detect missed messages.



-49-


RFC-869 December 1983



GATEWAY TRAP FIELDS

Gateway Version #

The software version number of the gateway sending the trap.

Trap Reports

The remainder of the trap message consists of the trap
reports. Each consists of the following fields:

Size of Trap Entry

The size in 16-bit words of the trap entry, not
including the size field.

Time of Trap

The time in (in 1/60 sec. ticks) at which the trap
occurred.

Trap ID

The number of the trap which is used to identify the
trap.

Process ID

The identifier of the process that executed the trap.

R0-R6

The registers of the machine at the occurrence of the
trap.

Count of this Trap

The number of times that this trap occurred.













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RFC-869 December 1983



C.3 Message Type 2: Gateway Status

Description

The gateway status message gives a summary of the status of
the gateway. It reports information such as version number
of the gateway, buffer memory usage, interface status and
neighbor gateway status.

A Gateway Status message has the following format:









































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RFC-869 December 1983




0 1 1 2 3 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Version Number |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Patch Version Number |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Time Since Gateway Restart | ;in minutes
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Measurement Flags | ; Bit flags to indicate which
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ ; measurements are on, 1= On
| Routing Sequence No. | ; Sequence # of last routing
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ ; update sent
| Access Table Version # |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Load Sharing Table Ver. # |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Memory in Use |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Memory Idle |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Memory Free |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # of Blks | ; Memory Allocation Info
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Size of 1st Block (in bytes) |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # Allocated |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # Idle |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Size of n'th Block (in bytes) |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # Allocated |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # Idle |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
(continued)










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RFC-869 December 1983



Gateway Status Message (cont'd.)

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # of Ints. |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Int 1 Flags | ;Interface 1 Status Flags
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ ; Bit 0 - 1=Up, 0=Down
; 1 - 1=Looped, 0=Not
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Buffers | ; # of buffers on write Queue
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Time since last Status Change | ;Time since last up/dwn change
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # of Buffers Allocated |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Data Size for Interface |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Interface 1 Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
.
.
+---------------+
| Int n Flags | ;Interface n Status Flags
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Buffers |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Time since last Status Change |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # of Buffers Allocated |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Data Size for Interface |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Interface n Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # Neighbors |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| UP/DN Flags | ;Bit flags for Up or Down
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ ; 0 = Dwn, 1 = Up
. ; MSB is neighbor 1
. ; (as many bytes as necessary)
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Neighbor 1 Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
.
.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Neighbor n Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+



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RFC-869 December 1983



HMP FIELDS

System Type

Gateway = 4

Message Type

Gateway Status Message = 2

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Password or Returned Sequence Number

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time a trap message is sent
so that the monitoring center can order the received trap
messages and detect missed messages.

GATEWAY STATUS FIELDS

Version Number

The version number of the gateway sending the Status
message.

Patch Version Number

The patch version number of the gateway.

Time Since Gateway Restart

The time in minutes since the gateway was last restarted or
reloaded.








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RFC-869 December 1983



Measurement Flags

Flags that, if set, indicate which measurements are turned
on. Current values are:


Bit 0 = Message Generator
1 = Throughput
2 = Host Traffic Matrix
3 = Access Control 1
4 = Access Control 2
5 = Load Sharing
6 = EGP in Gateway


Routing Sequence Number

The sequence number of the last routing update sent by this
gateway.

Access Control Table Version #

The version number of the access control table.

Load Sharing Table Version #

The version number of the load sharing table.

Memory In Use

The number of bytes of buffer memory that are currently in
use.

Memory Idle

The number of bytes of buffer memory that have been
allocated but are currently idle.

Memory Free

The number of bytes of buffer memory that has not been
allocated.

MEMORY ALLOCATION INFORMATION

The next part of the status message contains information on
the buffer pools in the gateway. The fields are:

# of Blocks


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RFC-869 December 1983



The number of different buffer pools.

Size of Block

The size of this block in bytes.

# Allocated

The number of blocks of this size that have been
allocated.

# Idle

The number of blocks of this size that are idle.

GATEWAY INTERFACE FIELDS

The next part of the status message are fields that provide
information about the gateway's interfaces. The fields are:

# of Interfaces

The number of network interfaces that the gateway has.

Interface Flags

Flags that indicate the status of this interface. The
current values are:

Bit 0 - 1=Up/0=Down
1 - 1=Looped/0=Not Looped


Buffers

The numbers on this interfaces write queue.

Time Since Last Status Change

The time in minutes since this interface changed status
(Up/Down).

# of Buffers Allocated

The number of buffers allocated for this interface.

Data Size for Interface

The buffer size required for this interface.


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RFC-869 December 1983



Interface Address

The Internet address of this interface.

NEIGHBOR GATEWAY FIELDS

The final part of the status message consists of information
about this gateway's neighbor gateways. The fields are:

# of Neighbors

The number of gateways that are neighbor gateways to
this gateway.

UP/DN Flags

Bit flags to indicate if the neighbor is up or down.

Neighbor Address

The Internet address of the neighbor gateway.






























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RFC-869 December 1983



C.4 Message Type 3: Gateway Throughput

Description

The gateway collects throughput statistics for the gateway,
its interfaces, and its neighbor gateways. It collects them
for regular intervals and will save them for collection via
a Poll message from the Monitoring host. If they are not
collected by the end of the next interval, they will be lost
because another copy will be put into the saved area.

A Gateway Throughput message has the following format:

0 1 1 2 3 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Gateway Version Number |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Collection Time in Min |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Number of Interfaces |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Number of Neighbors |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Number of Host Unreachable | ; # of packets dropped because
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ ; Host was Unreachable
| Number of Net Unreachable |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ ; Net was Unreachable

; Interface Counters

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Interface Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Packets Dropped on Input |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of IP Errors |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of Datagrams for Us |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Datagrams to be Forwarded |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of Datagrams Looped |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
(continued)






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RFC-869 December 1983



Gateway Throughput Message (cont'd.)

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of Bytes Input |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of Datagrams From Us |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count that were Forwarded |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of Local Net Dropped |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of Queue full Dropped |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of Bytes Output |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
.
.
.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| |
| Counters For Additional Interfaces |
| |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

; Neighbor counters

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Neighbor Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of Routing Updates TO |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
|Count of Routing Updates FROM |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
(continued)

















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RFC-869 December 1983



Gateway Throughput Message (cont'd.)

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Pkts from US sent to/via Neig |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Pkts forwarded to/via Neighb |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Datagrams Local Net Dropped |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Datagrams Queue full Dropped |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Count of Bytes send to Neighbor |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
.
.
.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| |
| Counters for Additional Neighbor Gateways |
| |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+


HMP FIELDS

System Type

Gateway = 4

Message Type

Gateway Throughput Message = 3

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Password or Returned Sequence Number

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time a trap message is sent
so that the HM can order the received trap messages and


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RFC-869 December 1983



detect missed messages.

GATEWAY THROUGHPUT FIELDS

Gateway Version Number

The software version number of the gateway sending the trap.

Collection Time in Min.

The time period in minutes in which the throughput data is
to be collected.

Number of Interfaces

The number of interfaces this gateway has.

Number of Neighbors

The number of neighbor gateways this gateway has.

Number of Host Unreachable

The number of packets dropped because the Host was
unreachable.

Number of Net Unreachable

The number of packets dropped because the Network was
unreachable.

INTERFACE COUNTERS

The next part of the Throughput message contains counters
for the gateways interfaces. Each interface has the
following fields:

Interface Address

The Internet address of this interface.

Packets Dropped on Input

The number of packets on input to this interface
because there were not enough buffers.

Count of IP Errors

The number of packets received with bad IP headers.


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RFC-869 December 1983



Count of Datagrams for Us

The number of datagrams received addressed to this
gateway.

Datagrams to be Forwarded

The number of datagrams were not for this gateway and
should be sent out another interface.

Count of Datagrams Looped

The number of datagrams that were received on and sent
out of this interface.

Count of Bytes Input

The number of bytes received on this interface.

Count of Datagrams From Us

The number of datagrams that originated at this
gateway.

Count that were Forwarded

The number of datagrams that were forwarded to another
gateway.

Count of Local Net Dropped

The number of packets that were dropped because of
local network flow control restrictions.

Count of Queue full Dropped

The number of packets that were dropped because the
output queue was full.

Count of Bytes Output

The number of bytes sent out on this interface.









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RFC-869 December 1983



NEIGHBOR COUNTERS

The last part of the Throughput message are counts for each
neighbor gateway. The fields are:

Neighbor Address

The Internet address of this neighbor gateway.

Count of Routing Updates TO

The number of routing updates sent to this neighbor
gateway.

Count of Routing Updates FROM

The number of routing updates received from this
neighbor gateway.

Pkts from US sent to/via Neig

The number of packets from this gateway sent to or via
this neighbor gateway.

Pkts forwarded to/via Neighb

The number of packets forwarded to or via this neighbor
gateway.

Datagrams Local Net Dropped

The number of datagrams dropped to this neighbor
gateway because of local network flow control
restrictions.

Datagrams Queue full Dropped

The number of datagrams dropped to this neighbor
because the output queue was full.

Count of Bytes send to Neighbor

The number of bytes sent to this neighbor gateway.








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RFC-869 December 1983



C.5 Message Type 4: Gateway Host Traffic Matrix

Description

The Host Traffic Matrix (HTM) message contains information
about the traffic that flows through the gateway. Each
entry consists of the number of datagrams sent and received
for a particular source/destination pair.

A Gateway HTM message has the following format:

0 1 1 2 3 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Gateway Version Number |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Overflow counter |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Collection Time in Min |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Number of HTM entries |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| IP Source Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| IP Destination Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| IP Protocol | (unused) |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Counter for SRC -> DST datagrams |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Counter for DST -> SRC datagrams |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
.
.
.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| |
| Additional HTM Reports |
| |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+









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RFC-869 December 1983



HMP FIELDS

System Type

Gateway = 4

Message Type

Gateway HTM Message = 4

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Password or Returned Sequence Number

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time a trap message is sent
so that the HM can order the received trap messages and
detect missed messages.

GATEWAY HTM FIELDS

Gateway Version Number

The software version number of this gateway.

Overflow counter

The number of HTM entries lost because the HTM buffer was
full.

Collection Time in Min

The time period in minutes in which the HTM data is being
collected.

Number of HTM entries

The number of HTM reports included in this message.




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RFC-869 December 1983



HTM ENTRIES

The remainder of the HTM message consists of the actual HTM
entries. Each entry consists of the following fields:

IP Source Address

The source Internet address of the datagrams being
counted.

IP Destination Address

The destination Internet address of the datagrams being
counted.

IP Protocol

The protocol number of the datagrams.

Counter for SRC -> DST datagrams

The number of datagrams sent in the Source to
Destination address direction.

Counter for DST -> SRC datagrams

The number of datagrams sent in the Destination to
Source address direction.























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RFC-869 December 1983



C.6 Message Type 6: Gateway Routing

Description

The Routing message contains information about routes the
gateway has to the networks that make up the Internet. It
includes information about its interfaces and its neighbor
gateways.

A Gateway Routing message has the following format:

0 1 1 2 3 3
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 1
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Version Number |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # of Ints. |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| UP/DN Flags | ;Bit flags for Up or Down
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ ; 0 = Dwn, 1 = Up
. ; MSB is interface 1
. ; (as many bytes as necessary)
.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Interface 1 Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
.
.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Interface n Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # Neighbors |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| UP/DN Flags | ;Bit flags for Up or Down
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+ ; 0 = Dwn, 1 = Up
. ; MSB is neighbor 1
. ; (as many bytes as necessary)
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Neighbor 1 Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
.
.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Neighbor n Address |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

(continued)




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RFC-869 December 1983



Gateway Routing Message (cont'd.)

+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| # of Networks |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Network 1 # | | | ; 1, 2, or 3 bytes
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Distance |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Neighbor # |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
.
.
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Network n # | | | ; 1, 2, or 3 bytes
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Distance |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+
| Neighbor # |
+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+-+

HMP FIELDS

System Type

Gateway = 4

Message Type

Gateway Trap Message = 6

Port Number

Unused

Control Flag

Unused

Password or Returned Sequence Number

Unused

Sequence Number

A 16 bit number incremented each time a trap message is sent
so that the HM can order the received trap messages and
detect missed messages.



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RFC-869 December 1983



GATEWAY ROUTING FIELDS

Gateway Version #

The software version number of the gateway sending the trap.

INTERFACE FIELDS

The first part of the routing message contains information
about the gateway's interfaces. There is data for each
interface. The fields are:

# of Interfaces

The number of interfaces that this gateway has.

UP/DN Flags

Bit flags to indicate if the Interface is up or down.

Interface Address

The Internet address of the Interface.

NEIGHBOR FIELDS

The next part of the routing message contains information
about this gateway's neighbor gateways. The fields are:

# of Neighbors

The number of gateways that are neighbor gateways to
this gateway.

UP/DN Flags

Bit flags to indicate if the neighbor is up or down.

Neighbor Address

The Internet address of the neighbor gateway.

NETWORK ROUTING FIELDS

The last part of the routing message contains information
about this gateway's routes to other networks. This
includes the distance to each network and which neighbor
gateway is the route to the network. The fields are:



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RFC-869 December 1983



# of Networks

The number of networks that are reachable from this
gateway.

Network #

The network number of this network. This is the
network part of the Internet address and may be one,
two, or three bytes in length depending on whether it
is a Class A, B, or C address.

Distance

The distance in hops to this network. Zero hops means
that the network is directly connected to this gateway.
A negative number means that the network is currently
unreachable.

Neighbor #

The neighbor gateway that is the next hop to reach this
network. This is an index into the previous
information on this gateway's neighbor gateways. This
field is only valid if the Distance is greater than
zero.

























-70-




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